Sometimes, ‘Belize’ isn’t the answer to all of life’s questions

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Rain is as much a part of life in Belize as sunshine, and just as critical for survival. Some folks might not like that.
Rain is as much a part of life in Belize as sunshine, and just as critical for survival. Some folks might not be able to cope with weeks and weeks of gray sky and drizzle.

If the answer to all of life’s difficult questions is “Belize,” then why don’t some expats succeed here, while others do?

It is not unusual to say goodbye to someone on whom we were about to bestow with Belize-friend-for-life status. More and more, it becomes clear that if you want to be here for the long-haul you have to behave more like a Rolling Stone than a Beatle.

Lately, on Ambergris Caye, the stinky sargassum has been as much a part of our lives as the sunshine and the rain -- all year, in fact. You won't find it on a post card in the souvenir shop.
Lately, on Ambergris Caye, the stinky sargassum has been as much a part of our lives as the sunshine and the rain — all year, in fact. You won’t find it on a post card in the souvenir shop.

Ok, you can insert your own pop or rock bands in there, but the point is, the Stones are still around making music and filling stadiums while the Beatles are but a fond memory. And there are reasons for that that transcend living a crazy rock-n-roll lifestyle.

Sigh. Never mind.

Instead of belaboring this analogy I’d like to give you some specific reasons why people don’t make the cut as ex-pats in Belize. Since I have only been here for a year and a half,  I won’t pretend to speak authoritatively on this subject.

These answers come from folks who have lived here much longer, for the most part.

You see, this question generated a lot of discussion recently on a Facebook page devoted to expats and ersatz expats. 

This too is a part of Paradise in Belize. Sometimes Paradise is noisy, stinky, chaotic -- just like the places we left behind.
This too is a part of Paradise in Belize. Sometimes Paradise is noisy, congested and chaotic — just like the places we left behind.

I get the feeling that we’re all ersatz expats until we have lived here at least two years. That is probably why I still name my blog “Bound for Belize,” even after a year and a half. I feel as though I am still moving toward Belize — emotionally, intellectually, socially, politically, spiritually — and will be for quite some time.

I can say “I am from Belize” but I dare not yet say “I am a part of Belize.”

Simple pleasures: If you can find great pleasure in watching a father teaching his son to fish, you may just succeed as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If you can find great pleasure in watching a father teaching his son to fish, you might just succeed as an expat.

So, here is how the question of why some expats don’t make it was put to the membership of a expat forum:

“It bothers me a bit to hear people not make it here. They come excited, and leave heartbroken. What is the disconnection? Why do some find Paradise and others find misery? Shame to waste that much time, money and effort … “

It is a great question but,  based on 78 responses that I read,  there is no single answer. Apparently there are lots of reasons why people don’t find their Paradise in Belize. 

Simple pleasures: If you can happen upon some island musicians jamming on a Monday afternoon and think of it as a highlight of your day, you just might make it as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If you can happen upon some island musicians jamming on a Monday afternoon and think of it as a highlight of your day, you might just succeed as an expat.

They fail to manage their expectations

Arriving with a rigid preconceived notion of what Belize is like can be dangerous. That could be a perception picked up during a one-week vacation here, or a notion promoted by real estate agents or companies that market to future expats or even from reading blogs like mine that perhaps celebrate the good times over the tedious ones.

A lot of people buy the stunningly beautiful postcard image and don’t see what is beyond the frame until they get here. Sometimes life here is like an amazing postcard image. Often times it is not.

“People think about the vacation in paradise,” says a contributor. “But don’t think about really living in paradise. Especially when it’s a foreign country. When you vacation, you are leaving your normal day to day behind — drinking more, hanging on the beach all day, trying new restaurants every day.

Simple pleasures: If you can find joy in holding the one you love on the end of a pier as the sun goes down, you just may make it as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If you can find joy in holding the one you love on the end of a pier as the sun goes down, you might just succeed as an expat.

“That’s not how most lives go on a day-to-day basis.”

As one writer says, “There should be some ‘expectation management.’

“When you live somewhere permanently, you have to accept that you are no longer on vacation. You are ‘home.’ While on vacation, there are some things you can tolerate living without, or accept inefficiencies. (As an expat), you have to prepare yourself and embrace those ‘inconveniences.’ Some people cannot.”

In other words, while on vacation, the plumbing is someone else’s problem. When this is your home, the problem is all yours.

As another writer puts it, “Often times they have unrealistic expectations and have no idea what the country is really like.”

And another: “Because you have to leave the USA or some other country behind, do not expect the same lifestyle. It is a different culture and style.”

If the idea of occasionally getting together with friends for a glass of wine makes you happy, you might just succeed as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If the idea of occasionally getting together with friends for a glass of wine makes you happy, you might just succeed as an expat.

And how is an expat to know what the country is “really” like?

Research, research, research

“They fail to research the smaller details,” offers one writer, adding a tongue-in-cheek checklist: “Speak English? Check. Palm trees and Beer? Check. OK … that’s everything I need to know to go live my life in paradise!”

Sometimes ersatz expats ask the right questions but the answers bounce off like solar you on sunblock. You can almost hear the frustration in the voice of longtime expats who have answered the tough questions over and over, like this one:

People come here and ask questions about jobs, medical, children’s education, buying property and everyone spends a lot of time answering their questions. We tell them to come visit first and find the right place for them. We tell them to rent for a year before buying. We tell them to bring LOTS of money. We tell them that the medical is not good if you have major issues. We tell them most businesses will fail. People do not listen, sadly enough.

There’s no doubt about it, Belize can be an impulse buy.

Especially if you are coming off the best damned vacation of your life and are heading back to yet another Midwest winter.

I should know. Rose and I read up a lot on Belize but we only spent 18 days traveling the country before deciding to move here. Eighteen days! What were we thinking?

Clearly there is always much more to learn before moving than you will ever have time for.

The reason why people move here is huge

This is a pretty common theme: “The people who packed it in within two years were looking for paradise — which doesn’t really exist — or were running away from something, rather than moving toward something.”

In other words, Belize isn’t an escape, it is an opportunity.

As one writer puts it: “Many come with baggage and think it will go away with a move to Belize. The problem with that is they only accumulate more baggage to add to the baggage they already had.”

If a collection of local flowers and leaves floating in a glass bowl fascinates you, you might just succeed as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If a collection of local flowers and leaves floating in a glass bowl endlessly fascinates you, you might just succeed as an expat.

Others echoed this theme:

  • You have to be happy with yourself first and foremost. A change in environment will not do it. Even if it’s paradise. Happiness comes from within.
  • Alcohol and pre-existing problems cause the failure.
  • The relief of warm winters wears off and they realize the rest of the year is hotter than the sun.

Don’t just sit there, do something

Ex-pats who don’t last often “fail to get involved in something/anything  — language classes, community work, gardening, animal rescue —  anything other than sitting around all day every day drinking.”

If you are unexpectedly handed a Belikin beer encrusted in ice and you thinnk "life is good," you might just make it as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If you are unexpectedly handed a Belikin beer encrusted in ice and you think “life is good,” you might just succeed as an expat.

It is so true. While you most likely can sit around and drink all day, just like you did when you came here on vacation, your life as an expat promises to be a short one, at least shorter than you might have planned.

A failure to assimilate into Belize culture

Why do people move to a foreign country and then try to make it as much like their old life as possible? That is a question more than a few expats ask. A certain amount of assimilation is needed before you can feel truly at home.

One observer puts it this way:

Those who fail have this one thing in common from my observation; They come to a foreign country with foreign culture, government, rules, practices ( like “right now” means never ), currency, etc.

They ship all their stuff from wherever, so that they feel comfortable. They build a house like the one they left, so they feel comfortable. They fill it with ‘stuff,’ so they feel comfortable.  Then they complain about the government, food, the government, etc. Then when something breaks, they can’t understand why they can’t find anyone to fix it, or if they do, they have to wait several weeks for a part that … was available at the local hardware store.

I hear, How come this? and Why not that?

Two years seems to be the point of return. At 1.5 years, I see it beginning to unravel. They leave hoping to sell fast. Their nightmare begins. Sadly, more don’t listen to others more. They try to make their new home exactly the same as the old one in another country in which they left. Why they left in the first place is beyond me.

Simple pleasures: If bicycling down to a produce stand really makes your day, you might succeed as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If discovering a fresh shipment of watermelons  at your favorite produce stand really makes your day, you might just succeed as an expat.

Adaptability, patience, attitude and acceptance

A friend who has been living in Belize for more than 20 years has a single simple phrase — a mantra really — that he he says when life just isn’t working: “This is Belize.”

One writer sees it this way: “It takes a certain mentality to accept Belize as it is and enjoy what it has to offer. Not everyone has that mentality and that is a good thing in my book, as well.”

Here’s an example of how attitude can work against you in Belize:

“We watched a guy with an attitude one time in Immigration. All  he did was yell and say ‘Back where I come from this doesn’t happen.’

“Yeah,  right. He was asked to sit down and would get called next. He sat for a very long time.

“Attitudes here is everything. Show just the slightest bit and you’re toast. I’ve made the misfortune of doing that by accident. It can be frustrating at times but just have to go with the flow.”

Simple pleasures: If you encounter this scene while snorkeling on the reef and think "Hot damn!" you might just make it as an expat.
Simple pleasures: If you encounter this scene while snorkeling on the reef and think “Hot damn, that’s cool!” you might just succeed as an expat.

Arrogance also can lead to an expat’s undoing. Surprisingly many people come down here eager to change Belize “for the better,” before they even understand what Belize is all about. One writer recalled an expat who was eager to “teach the Mennonites how to plant and grow food.”

Think about that.

By now you probably have figured out that the list of reasons why some people pack it in is mirrored by the list of why others make Belize their home for life. 

And also that the list is endless, varied and nuanced — and not uniformly applicable to everyone. There are people who succeed and flourish despite possessing some of the “negatives” listed here.

I could go on and on, but I’m beginning to hear the coughs and shoes shuffling in the back rows.

So, here is just a scattered sampling of the many other reasons people give up on their Belize dream  and head home — or to another country:

  • Some people are unhappy no matter where they are.
  • Sometimes they get homesick for their native country.
  • Some crave cultural and intellectual stimulation not found in Belize.
  • Sometimes they feel alienated by the locals and can’t find enough people of their own culture to connect with.
  • Sometimes they think they can make a living in Belize, and frankly that is super duper hard to do.
  • Some get tired of having to struggle to find things they want, or wait on things to arrive from the States.
  • It is expensive, even to live like a local.
  • It’s a lot easier for things to go wrong than right down here.
  • For some it might be one thing that just drives ‘em nuts … maybe it’s the bugs.
  • Medical needs — if they are significant, Belize is not the place to get them taken care of.

The best advice that I read comes off like a Buddhist Hallmark card but it really thick with truth worth heeding: “Home is where the heart is … peace comes from within … you need to come home.” 

And that’s it. With peace in your heart, you can live anywhere.

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30 thoughts on “Sometimes, ‘Belize’ isn’t the answer to all of life’s questions

    Belize Blog (@SanPedroScoop) said:
    September 25, 2015 at 5:57 pm

    Great article. GENIUS! Attitude FOR SURE. But all of those reasons are absolutely right. And if it’s not for you, you are not a bad person…it’s just not for you. Nothing is easy in Belize but everything is pretty simple…you just need to be patient, patient and have a sense of humor.

    Liked by 1 person

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      September 25, 2015 at 6:44 pm

      Excellent observations — attitude, patience, humor! Thank you, Rebecca.

      Like

    Emily said:
    September 25, 2015 at 7:27 pm

    Excellent article! The only thing I would take issue with is the terms fail and succeed. I don’t think we “failed” simply because we decided to leave Belize after 18 months. We had many amazing and wonderful times there, made some great friends, and many of the photos highlighted in your article are things that appealed to us very much — but ultimately, Belize just wasn’t quite the right fit for us long-term to nurture some of the things we wanted to do. I guess we were taken in by the beauty, the weather, and the desire for a simpler, car-free life, and those were all huge advantages of life there, but it just wasn’t quite enough at this particular time in our lives. Regardless, we learned a lot and gained much from our time there, even though we didn’t “make it” for the long haul. To me, that is still success. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    robertjhawkins1 responded:
    September 25, 2015 at 7:38 pm

    You are so right, Emily. Fail is the wrong term for many, especially for those who consciously choose to pursue life elsewhere. I’m not sure what a proper expression would be but let me see what I can come up with. I had decided early on in writing this that “fail” was not appropriate.

    Like

      Emily said:
      September 26, 2015 at 6:21 am

      Yes, I am not sure what the appropriate term would be. I thought about this article and our experience for some time last night after reading this, and the best I could come up to sum up our experience was that living in Belize and traveling all over the country enlightened us to what we really wanted to do (at least for awhile), and that was to travel more, see more, and bicycle more, all activities that were easier for us to do outside of Belize than in it. So Belize for us was kind of a stepping stone, an “experiment” from which much data was gathered, and in the process, helped us open our eyes to what we really craved. Perhaps that is yet another bullet to add to the “why people don’t remain Belize expats forever” list that was not mentioned.

      Liked by 1 person

        robertjhawkins1 responded:
        September 26, 2015 at 8:22 am

        One thing I have learned is that I crave the feel of 18 gears (that’s enough), touring tires and an open road to pedal.

        Experience is a stepping stone to enlightenment. Like being a movie critic — you have to watch a lot of good and bad movies before you know what you really like.

        Like

    Susan said:
    September 25, 2015 at 9:50 pm

    Such a great article and very timely for us (as you know) since we are determined to move there, without the prerequisite one year rental, but we have been there three times in one year and this last trip spent a whole 2 weeks! LOL!!! We were fortunate to have our dryer break down, the fan in our bedroom needed adjustment, the lights went out and the weather wasn’t “perfect”. Oh and I discovered there are snakes on the island and I still want to come! We’ve spent each trip there as if we lived there…trying to cook some of our own meals, perusing the grocery stores as well as the hardware stores to see just what we have to look forward to…or not and have even priced golf carts and boats…we read as much as we can and generally have no expectation of Belize being anything but Belize, a young Country with growing pains in Central America. We tell ourselves we are aware of the changes that will await us and for better or worse we are going to take the plunge, hopefully with our eyes wide open. Articles like this only make us more sure this is where our home will be, because our hearts are already there! We don’t want to change Belize, on the contrary, we’re hoping Belize changes us…for the better – attitude, patience, humor!

    Liked by 1 person

    Gwen said:
    September 26, 2015 at 6:35 am

    Great article, and I agree with the assessment that “Fail” isn’t quite right. I visited twice a year for 15 years, and lived there for 5 years. I could have kept on living in Belize forever probably. Everything negative came into play, a little. Summers and slow season were the “Thing”. Summer was as awful as where I came from in Maryland, but worse because it was unrelenting. Slow season was like waiting for something to happen. So, we thought, maybe be a snowbird? We explored a list of places that had great summers. Liked Prescott, AZ best. It’s similar: beautiful, interesting people, friendly, touristy, easy going, etc. It turns out, cheaper, better health care, great golf which we missed (now I miss fishing), easier living for over 65+ years, etc. Weather is great, year round, though. We won’t be snowbirds, but we will keep visiting Belize!

    Liked by 2 people

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      September 26, 2015 at 8:15 am

      Thanks for sharing, Gwen. Just as John East says in a comment on this page, “The people that move here and conclude that Belize ‘just isn’t for them’ are, in my opinion, ‘winners’.” There is no one perfect solutin for everyone and sometimes, it is the right one for a short while. Anyone who is seeking a better life wins.

      Like

    johnhenryeast said:
    September 26, 2015 at 6:38 am

    The people that move here and conclude that Belize “just isn’t for them” are , in my opinion, ‘winners’. They’re honest with themselves and don’t live a lie. They realise (and accept) that they misjudged (or didn’t fully comprehend) and do something about it.

    Liked by 1 person

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      September 26, 2015 at 8:10 am

      Completely agree John. Anyone who steps out of their lifelong comfort zone to try something new has already won.

      Like

    Sittee River John said:
    September 26, 2015 at 6:46 am

    Awesome article. My wife and I are about a month and a half from taking the plunge and are very much looking forward to our new life. Of course we understand living there will not be all peaches and cream, but if it was I don’t think we would have made the decision. Your article has opened our eyes to help prepare us to some extent. For that we thank you. We will be there soon Belize it or not. We shall see what our new life holds for us.😁

    Like

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      September 26, 2015 at 8:07 am

      Thanks, John. I think eyes wide open is probably the best strategy anyone can take for moving here, or any expat situation! And I completely agree — to some degree the “struggle” or “challenge” brings us back to life. When you come back from food shopping and think “Well, that was NO trip to the mall” and you see that as a positive, then I think you’ve won. Because I live in Belize, I feel alive! Good luck with your move!

      Like

    Peter said:
    September 26, 2015 at 7:46 am

    Great article Robert. For us it was one of three things, moving to Belize to make a living during your income earning years is risky and tough. Your better off doing Belize once you have earned your lifetime income and then dabble in a business or two while there but you still have your retirement funds set up. Two, although we didn’t have major medical issues while in Belize, the medical system needs drastic improvement, especially if it is being sold as a retirement hotspot. Belize does have many great Dr’s but the tools and education to do their job is lacking. Three, there is corruption and many unfinished initiatives that fall to the waistline, for example: the new ferry terminal on the lagoon side that is barely used, the imported ambulances on San Pedro never used, the many developments that shouldn’t be developments as they are an environmental disaster and on and on. There needs to be much better accountability on these projects and initiatives, money is often not used for what it was intended. This I found frustrating to shake off. Despite these reasons however, we loved the beauty of Belize, the slower lifestyle where you stop and smell the roses, the friendly communities, and the many hard workers in Belize. We will be back to visit as we love Belize at this stage in our life as a vacation destination. Hope all is well with you and Rose. Peter

    Liked by 1 person

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      September 26, 2015 at 8:02 am

      Thank you for contributing your thoughts and experiences, Peter. I know you guys worked hard and with great enthusiasm and probably did everything right. We hope you are landing just right and with fresh opportunity. Give us a shout next time you vacation this way!

      Like

    Dennis and Tamara Rossi said:
    September 26, 2015 at 10:13 am

    Spot on, Bob! In our case, we loved living on an island on the ocean for 2.5 years, especially coming from landlocked Santa Fe, NM! We read everything and every blog (Em and Bear in Belize and San Pedro Scoop were big helps) we could get our hands on, along with all the nitty gritty info about living there. In the end, we missed the city life and moved to Merida, Mexico for our next adventure….as we saw our move to Belize as our first adventure. We will undoubtably add more adventures to this stage in our life, but will never regret the times we had, the friends we made, and the outright beauty of the country and the people of Belize!

    Liked by 1 person

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      September 26, 2015 at 10:23 am

      Well said! We miss you guys but following your Merida life is great fun! Thanks for adding to the list of reasons for change!

      Like

        Dennis and Tamara Rossi said:
        September 26, 2015 at 11:40 am

        That was a beautiful blog post , Bob….thanks for spurring me on to do my little Merida one! Miss you guys too!

        Like

      Emily said:
      September 26, 2015 at 10:32 am

      Hi guys! We feel the same. Since leaving Belize, which was indeed a great adventure, we have traveled all over the US and are now enjoying Mexico (Playa del Carmen) for awhile. We just don’t want to limit ourselves and one thing we learned in Belize is that we were happier being nomadic at this stage of our lives than settling down somewhere for the long haul. Glad our BeBelize blog was helpful to you — it was something we really enjoyed doing while living on lovely Ambergris Caye!

      Like

        Dennis and Tamara Rossi said:
        September 26, 2015 at 11:38 am

        Hi Emily, so you returned to Playa! Are you going too take up the Traveling Twosome blog again? Please?

        Like

        Emily said:
        September 26, 2015 at 12:47 pm

        That’s so sweet of you! Perhaps we will get back to blogging one of these days, but for now, we are enjoying the break. Once we left Belize, our readership was so low we felt that we were spending a lot of time and effort just for our parents and a small handful of others. I guess I got a little tired of that, and it’s harder to come up with interesting posts when we’re in one place for awhile, like now. I see from your comment above that you have a blog now yourselves; would love to check it out if you post a link. Thanks! (And sorry for the comment hijack, Bob!)

        Like

        robertjhawkins1 responded:
        September 26, 2015 at 2:13 pm

        Ha! Ha! Carry on! I love seeing connections made and friendships renewed. (My work is done here ….) 🙂

        Like

    Aurorra said:
    September 27, 2015 at 10:25 am

    An interesting article and great comments. From my experience it is not win or fail, but rather coming to a new experience with an open attitude, a willingness to live embracing the new experience rather than looking back and comparing and focusing on what isn’t. By being present and open to the new, one can make an objective decision about whether this is a “for now” or a more permanent choice. In today’s world…what is permanent? And is permanent always the goal?

    I am a regular snowbird to Belize, my daughter is married to a Belizean, and Belize is their home. I have observed how expats approach life in Belize. As always, I have learned as much from those who are living “with” Belize as I have from those who are living “against” Belize.

    Thanks for the great post.

    Like

      Emily said:
      September 27, 2015 at 12:10 pm

      “In today’s world…what is permanent? And is permanent always the goal?”

      Great question, Aurorra, and I couldn’t agree more. In fact, it is some of the nomadic travelers we met while on Ambergris Caye that inspired us to embrace our own wanderlust moving forward. We’re not ready to settle down anywhere yet — for more than a year or two, at least. Been there, done that during our working years, and will certainly do it again one day, but that may be later rather than sooner. Thanks for the validation!

      Like

    Cayo Scoop said:
    September 30, 2015 at 4:49 pm

    Great blog article!

    I’ve seen over the decades here that what happens many times is that people will vacation here, and have an amazing time of course, and return home to their daily grind, and dream of the life here. When they move here after that, their expectations are totally off kilter since vacation time does not equal real life time.

    Add to that that many people, when packing up to move here, don’t just pack their belongings, but their unrealistic expectations, their drama, and their bigotry(in some cases), and the last 3 are the first things they unpack. And this environment isn’t too forgiving for that. They then end up complaining about everything, alienating those of us that have common threads with them. I’ve seen that happen a lot.

    You talk about paradise in the blog, and even incorrectly say it doesn’t exist. It does, all around us, in every city and every town. It’s just…I think of the Eagles song Last Resort, and the line: “They call it paradise, I don’t know why, You call someplace paradise,
    kiss it goodbye.”

    Like

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      September 30, 2015 at 7:40 pm

      Thanks for that very thoughtful message.
      I think people who move somewhere thinking that “life will be so much better” take the biggest hit. More likely, at first, “life will be so much different.” Then, when you work at it, bit by bit, life does get so much better. Because you put the work into it, your new life.
      Paradise does exist, I agree. (One of the writers stated otherwise and that was an opinion I felt ought to be expressed as well.)
      First you have to decide what Paradise means to you. And you need to separate the manufactured Paradise that assaults us all in marketing and sales pitches from the one that really works best for us, individually. Once you grasp the parameters of your own private Paradise, go for it.
      When I was pretty young and living in Washington DC, knowing I had a place to live and enough food to eat — pretty much, that was all the Paradise I needed because I’d experienced a taste of hell on the street.
      I love the ephemeral nature of Paradise in the Eagles song. Once you call something Paradise, it begins to crack, crumble and slip through your fingers. Interesting though. Can Paradise really be so elusive? There’s a whole TedX talk for you!

      Like

    […] is another great article on this topic from Robert J. Hawkins on his blog Bound for Belize. Follow Robert too, he is another great source on day to day life in Belize and, the […]

    Like

    SPmQQse said:
    October 27, 2015 at 11:08 am

    hmmmmm..i didnt see much mentioned about how totally corrupt , the GOB [government of belize] IS…AND MOST MINISTRIES OF THE GOB,…..[ including the police ]

    Like

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      October 27, 2015 at 11:19 am

      Honestly, I have no first-hand knowledge of corrupt government officials. Although I know of a certain would-be developer up here who has bragged a lot about how many politicians he has in his pockets. But I understand he had to tear down his billboard advertising when it turned out he didn’t have the licenses and paperwork needed to build his little condo project. Which makes you wonder, if a guy did have the government in his pocket why would he be so stupid as to brag about it? Makes me think he was all talk.

      Like

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