Sunday in San Pedro: Summer Solstice, global yoga, a Mayan blessing and the hunt for a stolen golf cart

Posted on

Dancers participating in Seummer Solstace seremonies at the Marco Gonzalez Myan Site, on Ambergris Caye, Belize on Sunday, June 21, 2015.
Dancers participating in Summer Solstice ceremonies at the Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site, on Ambergris Caye, Belize on Sunday, June 21, 2015.

Sunday morning came early and I awoke with a 50-pound quandary sitting on my chest.

Should I take the 5:45 a.m. water taxi to Belize City with Rose and participate in the International Day of Yoga events, which would no doubt bring harmony and peace to my troubled mind?

Should I wait beside the road at 9:10 a.m. for my friend Nick Barton and travel south to the annual Summer Solstice ceremony at the Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site? Perhaps I could ask the Mayan priest Martin Choc to pray for the recovery of our golf cart.

Or, should I just go looking all over the island for the golf cart that was stolen on Saturday night while we partied at the annual Lobsterfest Block Party?

Mayan priest Martin Choc at the Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site on Ambergris Caye, Belize on Sunday, June 21, 2015
Mayan priest Martin Choc at the Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site on Ambergris Caye, Belize on Sunday, June 21, 2015

What to do. What to do.

I shall spare you the suspense.

After bicycling to the taxi dock with Rose in the wee morning hours, and seeing her safely off with her yoga friends, I went to the police station and was successfully ignored for two hours in my quest to file a stolen vehicle report. Roundly defeated by the bureaucracy, I headed home for a quick shower and snack.

Then it was off to the Mayan blessings with Nick.

The Marcos Gonzalez Mayan Sit is one of 18 identified on this island, but the only one designated as a National Park. Compared to other Mayan ruin sites, this one is quite primitive.  Its development, under the enthusiastic guidance of  Jan Brown, is only in its infancy.

Mayan priest Martin Choc delivers a blessing to the assembled audience at Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site on Ambergris Caye , Belize during the Summer Solstice clebraton, Sunday, June 211, 2015. Behind him are some of the people who have made this ancient site possible through their generous donations of time and money.
Mayan priest Martin Choc delivers a blessing to the assembled audience at Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site on Ambergris Caye , Belize during the Summer Solstice clebraton, Sunday, June 211, 2015. Behind him are some of the people who have made this ancient site possible through their generous donations of time and money.

But with a little bit of imagination, and a lot of mosquito repellent, you can see that this site is steeped deep in potential.

Who knows? This might have been the first island resort for wealthy and powerful Mayan merchants and rulers from Tikal or Lamanai. It wouldn’t shock me one bit if the Mayans came up with the All-inclusive resort vacation concept. They were an awfully sophisticated people.

Smarter folks than me say this was a busy trading site some 2,000 years ago. They have identified 49 possible structures on the 7.57-acre site that rises up from the mangrove swamps. Reaching the site requires hiking on a quarter-mile-long raised footbridge.

One pathway leads into and out of the Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site. This boardwalk is one-quarter mile long.
One pathway leads into and out of the Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site. This boardwalk is one-quarter mile long.

On Sunday, about 30 of us made the trek to bear witness to the Mayan blessings of Martin Choc and enjoy some lovely ethnic dances by a local troupe in this most-appropriate  setting.  Here is a brief video of one of the dancers. Mr. Choc’s son gamely translated and summarized his father’s comments and incantations.

Even without the son’s assist it is quite moving to just hear this ancient language spoken in this most appropriate of settings. I for one felt a profound connection to the grounds as I listened to Mr. Choc intone the prayers that have been handed down over 2,000 years from priest to priest.

As an ancient merchants trading site, Marco Gonzalez holds the potential for profound discoveries some day. Who knows? They might have traded goods with sea voyagers from all points of the world. Buried deep in this site could be distinctive artifacts from Asia or Scandinavia or Africa. That is just my imagination talking. This is just a big sprawling birthday present and nobody really knows what is inside until it is opened up.

Meanwhile, I didn’t give a moment’s thought to my stolen golf cart while falling under the calming spell of Martin Choc’s prayers and incantations. It will be found, I’m sure and I’ll have something else to write about for for now, walking in the shadows and footsteps of this ancient people was quite blessing enough for a Sunday morning.

Here are some more images of Maya Priest Martin Choc as he performs a blessing over the grounds of the Marco Gonzalez Mayan Site:

FullSizeRender (85) IMG_2500 IMG_2502

More images of the ethnic dancers who entertained the gathering on Sunday:

IMG_2517 IMG_2527 IMG_2520 FullSizeRender (84) IMG_2549 IMG_2550 IMG_2551 FullSizeRender (83) IMG_2492

 

Some images from around the Marco Gonzales Mayan Site:

IMG_2559 (1) IMG_2560 (1)

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Sunday in San Pedro: Summer Solstice, global yoga, a Mayan blessing and the hunt for a stolen golf cart

    Miranda said:
    June 22, 2015 at 3:52 pm

    Bob, last year, I was at my condo at ALV, and my two nieces and one of their babies (only about Three months old) came to visit me. They came to
    Belize City by water taxi. After stuffing all their luggage into my rented cart, I drove everyone back to my place. Upon arriving and unloading everything, I saw some unfamiliar styrofoam containers. I realized I had taken the wrong cart! I drove at top speed back into town. I parked the cart where I had taken it from, and was very glad to find mine a few spaces down. Seeing two policemen, I felt the need to confess. They laughed, and said that all the carts have the same key.
    My point is, maybe it was just an accidental “theft”, like mine was. Maybe you should check out where you had parked your cart again.
    Good luck.

    Like

      robertjhawkins1 responded:
      June 22, 2015 at 7:24 pm

      A friend with a cart rental business said that happens more often than you would think! He lost a cart for four days. It was found at a resort up north — a case of mistaken identity by a drunken tourist. Props to you for returning the cart and making things right! I agree, hoping it is a similar case or just a quick joy ride home by a local ……

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s